JSHealth says it ‘meant nothing’ to claim the product cures Alzheimer’s disease

0
52

Celebrity-backed vitamin brand JSHealth says it was ‘never our intention’ to claim turmeric formula cures cancer and Alzheimer’s disease after being fined $26,640

A vitamin brand popular with Australian celebrities and influencers has released a statement saying it was never intended to imply that the turmeric formula cures cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

Sydney-based JSHealth, founded by multimillionaire Jessica Sepel, was fined $26,640 by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for unlawful advertising after claiming the supplements could prevent “serious health problems.”

The brand responded to the ruling in an Instagram post Thursday, and “clarified” a previous blog post advertising the purported benefits of JSHealth’s Turmeric+ formula.

The statement also accused news outlets of “misinterpreting the situation.”

“In this blog, we introduced our formula and listed the official indications,” wrote a JSHealth representative.

“In a separate section, we briefly discussed C3 turmeric extract, an ingredient in our Turmeric+ formula, citing the research studies behind this isolated ingredient because we found them interesting.

“It was never our intention to suggest that those studies pertain to our formula itself, but only to the ingredient C3 extract.

“We make sure our formulas meet strict guidelines and only use permitted health claims.”

The statement went on to say that JSHealth takes the TGA fine “seriously” and that “compliance with regulatory law is a top priority.”

“Our commitment is always to present information and education about products and ingredients with care, accuracy and integrity,” the post continued.

“Each formulation has been successful because of the integrity and trust behind it. Thank you for your continued support.’

The statement also accused news outlets of

The statement also accused news outlets of “misinterpreting the situation.” (Pictured: Brand founder Ms. Sepel with vitamins formulated for women going through menopause)

The brand received two notices of infringement for unlawful use of restricted and prohibited representations in advertising for listed complementary medicines.

The company’s advertising contained claims that the product could treat or prevent serious health problems, including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

See also  Pregnant Molly-Mae Hague stuns in new video for PrettyLittleThing

These are restricted and prohibited shows that cannot be used in advertisements without permission from the TGA, which the company did not have.

The brand received two notices of infringement for unlawful use of restricted and prohibited representations in advertising for listed complementary drugs by the TGA

The brand received two notices of infringement for unlawful use of restricted and prohibited representations in advertising for listed complementary drugs by the TGA

Before a company can advertise to Australian consumers a therapeutic good that can treat serious health problems, it must file an application with the TGA supporting the claims it proposes to make.

Such an application must usually include scientific studies and other evidence to support such a claim.

Advertisers of therapeutic goods are cautioned that failure to comply with the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 will have financial and reputational consequences.

Many Australian influencers, including Married At First Sight star Martha Kalifatidis (pictured), have promoted JSHealth on social media

Many Australian influencers, including Married At First Sight star Martha Kalifatidis (pictured), have promoted JSHealth on social media

Advertisement

.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here